Summer Feedback Trilogy Part 2 Fast Feedback Trials and Observation Risks

The science faculty have been trialling their ‘fast feedback’ ideas all year and their original shared ideas and reasons for their trial are here.

http://blog.meolscophighschool.co.uk/?p=1187

Their PPA is planned on the timetable so that they are able to meet and plan together once a week and obviously one of the topics might be to share feedback ideas and adapt their ‘fast feedback’ trial from the lessons continually learned. The ideas shared in this blog follow on from part 1 where I explained that this week the whole school shared their Magic Moments celebrating good practice gathered  from our summer observations and book monitoring. This is our second and final ‘big share’ of the year and follows our winter one explained in this post.

http://blog.meolscophighschool.co.uk/?p=1521

It’s really important to me that staff get the chance to talk honestly and openly to each other about their practice in small groups and then their conversations are shared whole school. This gives the opportunity for colleagues from different faculties the chance to 1] nab ideas, 2] go and talk to someone about an idea they like, 3] offer support to a colleague who asks for it with a certain teaching issue, 4] choose to plan and work with a colleagues from another faculty on a similar idea, 5] informally observe and for middle leaders and senior leaders the evidence to help them prioritise PD needs and support.

Science

Observation Risks:

CM – I chose to cover independent learning as the main topic for my lesson observation. I introduced pupils to a new topic and gave them minimal support. They were provided with a straightforward introduction, some simple instructions to find their feed using the equipment and chemicals. Then more detailed instruction to perform a neutralisation reaction. There were then questions to complete to allow pupils to consolidate their learning. The risk was that pupils could have just floundered and not actually done anything. They could have wasted a lot of time and not completed the tasks claiming they didn’t really understand what they were supposed to do. However they were fine and all but two pupils made very good progress. To increase the risk further I introduced the idea of recording evidence on voice recorders and cameras with a view to overcoming the issues of lost time from reluctant writers and weaker literacy lowering quality of evidence of scientific learning. This aspect of the observation was very encouraging and will be taken forward next year with a paired trial.

HS- with 8.5 the risk I took in the observation was the independence of the lesson, students learned by discovery.  They “played a game” that enabled them to find out how a carbon atoms moves through a cycle, and to appreciate it is a cycle, it doesn’t have a start or end point.  This was a risk as they are accustomed to me stopping and explaining when something gets difficult, they haven’t read instructions or get stuck.  Students moved around the room for 15minutes with no input from me, I was surprised to see how all the students got on with the task, followed the instructions and gathered all the information they would later need for the closing questions. I will develop this further next year by focusing on independent learning within the classroom with 10.4 a different class who I have discovered recently respond really will to learning through discovery.

HW – Pupils were given the task (to see how concentration affected rate of reaction) and the equipment in a tray, and had to safely work out the method and record their results. This was a risk as they’re used to either me demonstrating the practical at the front, or giving them a detailed method sheet.

This worked really well, I think due to the way I had arranged the ‘Science buddy’ pairs so they could help each other. If anyone ever asked me a question I said ‘could your buddy answer that?’ and it turns out most of the time they could!

As well as this risk, I purposely didn’t tell them what concentration was, and tried to get them to use their prior knowledge, results, and a diagram to create their own definition of concentration, and then use this to explain why they got their results. This had mixed success, but I’m glad I tried it as some pupils surprised me with their ability to think conceptually and apply quite difficult scientific knowledge.

FD – I chose to promote independence and student ownership of own learning for my lesson observation focus.  I introduced students to a ‘big’ scientific question which they were to devise their OWN answer and definition of during the course of the lesson.   Learning activities/episodes were planned and set up that would contribute to their own internal understanding of the ‘big question.’  The practical elements of the learning were deliberately planned to challenge student thinking from their previous understanding in order to really cement the concept in their minds.  Firstly, the students completed a basic investigation to note that mass did not change when a chemical reaction took place.  To challenge this, students were asked to test this theory with a reaction that would release gas (thereby losing mass as gas atoms) and explain this phenomenon compared to their initial thoughts.  All pupils could explain that mass was lost due to atoms escaping as a gas.  To further challenge this in their minds, I asked them to consider if the mass would change in a reaction if you could increase the volume of the product considerably from start to end of a chemical reaction.  When this demonstration confirmed that mass does indeed remain constant in chemical reactions, a real penny dropping moment was struck.  Some high level (penny dropping) explanations in terms of atoms and atomic/molecular arrangements in chemical reactions (in reactants & products) were provided by some students which was very rewarding.

Students were required to convert their own thinking and verbal responses into written dialogue in an organised, coherent way that used scientific terminology appropriately.

The biggest risk was asking students to work through various practical based scenarios about a scientific concept (conservation of mass) and devise their own theory in a coherent written format, using appropriate scientific terminology.

The risk was that students could have wasted time during the practical elements and would not really understand how to convert this learning into written dialogue.  But they all did!  A peer assessment of the written dialogue was undertaken to ensure all students could provide this written work to the gold standard required for progress, with dedicated time provided for improvements to their written work where required.  The standard of the written responses was very encouraging.

I will take this aspect of providing learning episodes to answer a ‘bigger question’ independently through to my maths teaching from September, promoting the ability to problem solve in our learners which is a strong focus of the new mathematics curriculum.

WS- The main risk was in letting students undertake a practical task without any verbal instructions. They had a practical sheet and were told they could ask for me or Mr K to read it not explain it. The premise was to use” 3 before me” to support each other and develop resilience. It went well because at first students did do the practical wrong and weren’t quick enough assembling the equipment to collect the gas produced. However, this was not a barrier and they adopted a great growth mind set ( which we have been working on for 2 years, although not calling it that) by keeping going, not getting stressed and trying the procedure in a different way and they were all ultimately successful, by helping and watching each other and they obtained the results required.

The wonderful thing is that they are very comfortable to learn by trial and error and the principle of learning being a journey and not quite being there “yet” but still striving for gold and even platinum, showing commitment to learning rather than being taught.

PJ – The risk that I took in the recent observed lesson was to let the students work with as much independence as possible to answer a question that I posed at the beginning by carrying out an experiment. I then got the students to teach others what they found out and they had to answer questions on that as well. It went really well but could have gone wrong right from the start.

Whole Department Highlights and Developments:

Highlights of Book Monitoring

  • The use of colours to show peer, self and teacher feedback, as well as clear evidence of response to feedback and redrafting.
  • The clear progress in the books.
  • The use of peer and self-assessment. Highlights of observations
  • The independent nature of the observations
  • Trialling new ideas e.g. PJ and IRIS, and CM with visual and oral evidence for progress from hand held devices.

Next year’s T&L focus

  • Interleaving Trials:
  • CM IPad, meaningful homework’s
  • PJ IPad, IRIS
  • RM HW HS independence high middle and low
  • HW questioning
  • Whole department, meaningful learning through practical’s

Feedback evidence:

HS:

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS1

The student at first has described how the paint and car attract but they missed out a key concept of the particles repelling, this was addressed in blue pen.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

BS2

Here there has been discussion to clear up the confusion of the pulmonary artery and vein, and understanding how they aid delivery of oxygenated blood to the body.

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving itBS3

Students were given various targets 1-6 and 7 they decided on their own.  The targets where based on what makes a “gold” student and marks that are lost for silly little reasons, e.g. not using the correct key word, not reading the question properly, (dash-it marks).  The students totted up where they lost marks that could have been achieved with little extra effort, set a target, said how they will address it and said what the evidence of this will be.

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

BS4

bs51

Students self assessed, then peer verified work to show progress.

HW

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

bs52

bs53

Pupils first attempted an open-ended question ‘why don’t people need to mow their lawns in winter’. This was to assess knowledge remembered from the previous lesson and any other prior knowledge. Then the answers were discussed in pairs, then as a class, then a model answer shown. Although the peer assessment in this example isn’t very detailed, he has shown the keyword ‘glucose’ is missing. Then her redraft has massively improved as she has included more keywords and successfully linked it back to glucose. Her improvement is SPaG based, which she struggles with due to her dyslexia (links to CMs study about the use of iPads removing any literacy barriers but allowing pupils to still show their scientific knowledge).

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

BS6

Conservation of mass can be hard for some pupils to understand as they assume if you’re reacting two things together, the product must have gained mass because they’re adding together. Or reversely if you add two chemicals to make one product, it must be lighter.

So I showed them the particle models of a reaction and got them to count how many of each element were on each ‘side’ of the arrow (top 4 lines). I then got them to answer some maths questions to prove conservation of mass (e.g. 7g + ??? à 10g, what is missing?)  They could then write their own scientific definition, which I was very impressed with!

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

bs54This pupil really struggles with his literacy and doesn’t enjoy writing. However here he has attempted a question, self-assessed it, improved it to nearly perfect (5/6) and then redrafted the whole thing again to get full marks. Even better – I’d said to him ‘just add in the bit you missed out’ as I know he’s a slow writer, but he persisted and did the whole thing again as he ‘wants it perfect’!

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

bs55

Self-reflection on their learning before an assessment. Very honest, and after reading my comment she came to see me at break to ask about the page numbers she needed to look at in her textbook ‘for the carbon cycle’. She then came back at lunch and said she didn’t like the textbook page, and could she take her exercise book home as she prefers her notes from class. This shows great GMS as she’s identified her weakness and is working on improving it rather than giving up. She then successfully answered the carbon cycle question in her assessment, and said ‘oh my god Miss, revision works!’ I think without this reflection beforehand, she would have attempted to revise everything, felt overwhelmed and given up.

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

BS9

Redrafting

Pupils were given a hypothesis they had to write a method to test. First attempt was without any help on what makes a good method. Then after a class discussion, they had a second attempt that was peer assessed. Then the third attempt has also improved. Although the 3 methods are all similar, the subtle improvements are necessary for scientific methods. This redrafting (although still not perfect) has shown this class in particular (that doesn’t like writing!) that if you do it properly and thoroughly once, it won’t need correcting. This redrafting has told me as a teacher that the class needs a further ‘method skills’ lesson to a) see if they revert back to the style of the first attempt, and b) to improve further with how they measure 1m, the distances, etc.

WS:  My belief is that Growth Mind Set is everything and if we get that right everything else will automatically follow as we have laid such a good framework to enable learners.

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS10

Student was then able to calculate mass number and atomic number and relate to the number of sub-atomic particles

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

Adaptation of NTEN techniques in classroom to improve retention

BS11

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it.

BS14

 

BS15

BS13BS12

Optional GYM homework set on cystic fibrosis and after discussion – the optional homework was re-drafted

BS16

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

BS17

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

GYM review sheets

BS18

CM:

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS19

Katie Badley – structure of the leaf (Y7) CM

Katie completed her original work in black pen, I provided initial feedback in green pen. Katie then made some minor amendments in blue that I had requested then improved it by adding an additional paragraph for the missing details.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

Aimee Blundell – Ray diagrams and law of reflection (she had set up her equipment incorrectly).

BS20

BS21

Aimee Blundell did had not really appreciated all the details required for the ray diagram, particularly the reflection points from the mirror and had set the equipment up with the mirror in slightly the wrong position so the back of the mirror was not lined up with the line. This meant her incident and reflected ray did not line up. After some feedback she made some labelling additions in blue then went on to repeat the investigation and get the ray diagrams and angles perfect!

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

BS22

BS23

Laura Pendlebury – Law of reflection and ray diagrams CM

Laura took four attempts to get the diagram correct and use the protractor carefully. She kept going though which is a great mind set. Laura often jokes that she puts more graphs in the bin than she gets right in her book, but she always keeps going, which is fantastic.

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

BS24

BS25

Ally Lyon – determination of population of species CM

Ally self-marked her population piece (original work completed in black and self-marked in red pen) then redrafted it in blue. This was then peer assessed by Eleanor and peer verified by Nour.

BS26

BS27

Ally Lyon – nuclear radiation, the gamma knife CM

Original work in black pen, peer assessed with improvements by Nour, then redrafted in blue the following lesson.

  Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

BS28

Fast Feedback, Zoe King CM

– shows use of coloured pens to speed up marking, self-assessment in red pen, peer question in blue that is then pupil response in black

FD:

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS29 The students work was peer assessed in red pen.  The peer assessment was ineffective at identifying exactly what the learner was missing to improve their answer to achieve the Gold criteria.  After checking the peer assessment and marking myself in green pen I highlighted the learning gap to the student in question.  The learner has responded in blue pen to my feedback, evidencing that they now understand this concept, closing this specific learning gap for this learners understanding of the causes of day and night.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

BS30

This student did not appreciate that when explaining the concept of diffusion, that specific scientific key words must be used for it to be assessed as Gold standard.  The student’s first attempt at the explanation is written in blue pen.  I have assessed the students work in green pen, asking for a definition using key words that have been taught during the course of the topic.  Without reminding the student of the actual key words to use, the penny has dropped for this student as the improved definition is perfect!

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

BS31

 

Dan Hinchcliffe Set 7.2 – Dan followed all feedback and kept repeating his attempts at Sankey diagrams until he had perfected it and reached the Gold standard

BS34

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

BS35

Charlie Shields 7 set 2 – here is an example of Charlie’s self-assessment of homework.  He addresses any knowledge gaps by including correct answers in purple pen – to aid revision of the topic

BS36

This shows another example of Charlie responding to peer feedback to improve upon his original work

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

BS37

Fast feedback – peer assessed in red pen – the peer assessor has added a fast note in red pen and arrows to indicate where answers are the wrong way around to provide fast feedback to the learner.

RM:

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS38

BS39

The students above were really struggling to grasp the concepts in fractional distillation. They attempted a six marker and RAG’d it and it was peer assessed. They then used their feedback to have another ago, and RAG’d their work again. This was then followed by a final peer assessment and feedback given by me. The process took two lessons but I really felt that the students ended with a much better understanding of fractional distillation.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

BS42

 

 

7.7 students really struggle to complete any work independently. I completed a two week growth mind set project with them which led to them becoming much more independent and confident in their own ability. There is one student in particular who suffers from low confidence. She is actually one of the more able student in the class but she will not attempt any piece of work without reassurance from the TA. Over the two weeks, she really proved to herself how capable she was of doing tasks independently. She showed such good growth mind set over the two weeks that I chose her as one of my growth mind set stars for my observation lesson with this class. She did not complete the same tasks as anyone else as her role was to peer assess and give feedback to the other students on their work. It was lovely to see her having the confidence to guide other students – something that she had always been capable of doing but had never been confident enough to. I think it was a penny dropping moment for both her and me to see how she could come in just two weeks.

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

BS43

BS44

I completed a two week growth mind set project with 7.7 in which the students really concentrated on becoming more independent learners. The students started by writing growth mind set pledges, choosing things such as ‘I will not say I can’t’ and ‘I will not give up’. The students were given a series of tasks to compete independently each lesson and those who did particularly well were awarded growth mind set stars as seen before. They were also given peer and teacher feedback throughout the project. The end result of this project was that the majority of the students were able to work independently for 45 minutes. This was a big achievement for these students who previously would not attempt anything without help or support from myself or the TA.

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

BS45The student above has been given specific feedback and advice of how to improve. They have then redrafted their work, and have then had it verified by another student who had given them further feedback. This dialogue has led to them producing a work of high standard (but not particularly good presentation!) that included most of the necessary key words for the topic.

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

All of the above examples show evidence of DIRT. We have tried very hard to incorporate DIRT into all of our lessons over the last year, and the students are now well practiced at completing peer assessment and improving, redrafting and reflecting on their work. There are also above examples of students redrafting their work – students now know not to hand any work in that hasn’t been marked (by either themselves or a peer) and improved on within the lesson.

PJ:

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

BS46

Student replied to feedback by identifying the answer then they used that further knowledge to help them define a keyword within the lesson.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

In my observed lesson one group predicted an incorrect outcome to a practical before carrying it out. Then when they did the practical they were able to identify they were wrong and why. This is evidenced in my lesson plan.

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

BS47

For whatever reason the image was beyond my GM and rotating skill! Sorry Phil!

Yr7 student answering a DIRT question. Could label the parts of an animal or plant cell but I wanted to see if they really understood and could take it further by telling me what each part does. As you can see they were able to do this so I threw in an extra one that they had missed out and they got that as well.

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

BS48

Above is an example of a DIRT lesson at KS4. These lessons are also done with ks3. In these lessons students answer an open ended question with as much information as they can remember from the week. These questions are then peer assessed in red pen and any improvements given. Students then redraft their work taking into account these improvements in blue pen. They are then rechecked by myself.

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

The above picture also shows an example of re drafting and how it is carried out. The below picture is an example of how I use SPAG. In this example I have shown a literacy question which centres around a common spelling mistake in science – Fluorine. This is an area I feel I need to improve on.

BS49

Carmel has also been thinking about how to keep an on-going faculty reflection, rather than waiting until a distant time and SLT requests for a current state of play. I’m keen for all to contribute any ideas that will save time/ease work-load. Creative ideas shouldn’t just come from the top-all need to be able to put ideas forward and try them out. I’m interested to see how this one works out and if other faculties try something similar.

David, Leon,

I was thinking of ways to collect department level evidence of sharing and reflection after our discussion yesterday. I need a way that is helpful to us as a department, uses minimal time and could be done as we go along (same criteria as we used when we developed fast marking).

I have mocked one up for you below.  I know it may appear like a list of trivial details, but these are the real items that are done day to day to build a bigger picture and that is the important point. This will then form the raw data for mine and Hannah’s reflection at the end of the year.  

I am hoping it will show our ideas and practices evolving over time and how everyone is contributing. It will be held in a spread sheet which people can add to at any point, the topic is there so we can sort by topic.

I’d like to think of it as one long set of meeting minutes, a meeting that we are all attending all the time! I anticipate most people will contribute on an adhoc but weekly basis and we have agreed that it could take the place of our after school weekly science meeting, to free up peoples time to add their contributions. Perhaps the next evolutionary step in department meetings as it is not limited by start and end times.

I have mocked up some data entries to give you an idea of the type of thing that could be included but who knows what people will add!

What do you think?

date Comment Feedback topic
HS Trialled learning by discovery with 8.5, 15 mins without any guidance and actually GOT THE CARBON CYCLE at the end. Going to try it with 8.4 next lesson. HW – can you send a link, 8.3 don’t quite get it yetHS W:\Science\Book Monitoring and observation 14-15\Summer observations\Observation resources\HS\Carbon Cycle Game.docxWS – I’ll try it too

CM  – can someone add it to the SOW pls, ta

T & L
WS Trying optional GYM homework with 8.6 CM – hmmm, let me know if they do it – could it be a step too far??HS – interestingWS – 25% have done it!

CM – that’s more than I would have expected – great idea Wendy will you do it again

WS – done another this week

WS – 45% this time, and Ella Thistlethwaite has redrafted it after id marked it! Really proud

CM – Wow amazing

Homework
HW My books are looking really good with these coloured pens. I’m doing my DIRT couple of times a week, makes marking quick. CM – can you add the dirt tasks into the SOW slidesHW – doneRM – I used them, really great thx Holly Marking
RM Coloured pens going well, books look really good but its taking too long to manage giving them out and taking in HS – try making pen packs, Val has some small plastic bagsWS – I use pen packs tooCM – pen packs didn’t work for me as pupils didn’t always put pens back in them. I’ve got wooden blocks with holes drilled in them. equipment
CM My y 11s are getting behind as they are so much slower in the afternoon – had to use my consolidation week just to finish C4 PJ – me tooRM – me too, set 2 are a real problem Tuesday afternoon. I’ve had to speak to KRHW – me too

CM – not a lot we can do except really push the pace in the Thursday lesson.

CM – my 11.6 are ahead of 11.1! that the effect of 75% afternoon lessons.

CM – Maths finding similar issue but there’s is a 50% split.

CM – shouldn’t happen next year as going to 2 week timetable.

behaviour
CM Have found kerboodle – an online homework for OCR GCSE, think may be good for KS4 intervention. Got a free month trial, gives you reports of results so you can see who is struggling. HS – does it do triple too?CM yes I’ve emailed everyone logonsWS – love it, they can practice as many times as they like before doing it

RM – great ill set some

CM – I have found that setting the same one three times and getting them to do it immediately after each other works really well for recall .

HW – I’m setting them – can we order them

CM it’s in budget for next year, can use as hw too.

Intervention
PJ Thought about doing a lesson using IRIS CM – Brave – let me know how it goesPJ – student teacher wants to do one too.HW – fab, let me know how she gets on.

CM – anyone else want to do IRIS?

 

T & L
CM Going to set up some multi choice recall quizzes on ……for lunchtime intervention if anyone wants them I can share HS – they can run them in my lab if you want.WS – can I send someCM – yes just send me list of names

WS – I will help chase people up and deliver them if you like.

CM – Ta

CM – People keep forgetting to chase up – I’ve emailed learning tutors to prompt but still not running smoothly.

WS – I think it’s because we are alternating the weeks between 11 and 10.

HS – yes I think you are right, they mean to come but just forget.

CM – let’s try and find another way, this is not being effective for anyone. Quizzes are good though so we can use them in lessons.

intervention
CM Year 10 triple girls are becoming really amazing at peer assessment and redraft – able to correct the science effectively PJ – yes I was impressed with them too.RM – 10 4 definitely not there yetCM – 10 5 ok, I’ll send you some of the scaffolds I’ve got. Marking
WS Controlled assessments running behind schedule as we don’t have enough balances HW – agreedRM – me too agreedHS – yep

PJ – defo

CM – message received (problem the 0.01g ones are £400!)

equipment
CM Going to trial ‘print your own stickers’ that Greg uses RM – I’ve seen his books I love themCM – let me know if you want a box of blanks to print on.HW – can I see some when they’re done Marking

PE

The PE faculty worked incredibly hard during Sport’s Week [as did others!] and had to be flexible and re-arrange plans quickly when the weather turned. It really is the highlight of our school year and the team spirit both students and staff engender and display really shows the power of the alternative curriculum. The PE folks still managed to meet to share some of their ideas like the old pros that they are! This old pro, after foolishly playing in the year 8 girls 5 a side and the 2 staff v year 11 helpers’ games, has had to forsake his Sunday bike ride and write a blog because he is still stiff!

Feedback that the student acted upon and you then have the evidence that it closed a specific learning gap

Aaron- Creating dialogue with students in books, use of dot marking in psd lessons enabled me to show this within my book monitoring and I feel this has closed the gap.

Sam- Video footage of year 7 girls doing the tennis serve. Girls acted upon the advice after watching a pro tennis player and their improvements are clearly evidenced in the video footage.

Tom- Use of ipads of analysis of high jump technique, students were able to analyse their performance which lead to a massive improvement.

Rosie- Video footage for year 10 GCSE group, which helped the lower attainers watch their own and other performances to help identify targets for improvement. Video footage is evidence of before and after.

Feedback that you can evidence was a real penny dropping moment that might have taken ages to for it to drop!

Aaron- Year 9 mixed GCSE group fully understand that GCSE PE consists of 40% theory as well as 60% practical which is more challenging but has been drip fed to improve their knowledge and understanding which will bridge the gap for year 10.

Tom- Use of growth mind set in lessons to allow students to understand how to develop their skills.

Sam- Lower year 7 girls have fully understood that it is far easier to remain confident and up beat instead of letting things get to them.

Rosie- Lower year 7 girls have fully understood that is far easier to communicate and remain positive and start to use team work to achieve success rather than trying to do everything solo.

Feedback that you feel showed a tremendous piece of mind-set from the student involved in achieving it

Rosie- See book monitoring (Katie MacDonald book)- massive improvement for 10 mark questioning.

Aaron- During KS3 PE observation student gave feedback and was then asked to re-do it which was in more detail and of a much higher standard.

Tom- During observation students taking a lead learning role and developing other student’s skills through analysis of performance in cricket (Dylan Burrows).

Sam- Students used home learning to research the skeletal system producing high quality resources for their next lesson (Rachel Cresswell).

Feedback from self/peer that was a superb example of honest critique with examples/follow up checking/success

Aaron- Creating dialogue with students in books, use of dot marking in psd lessons enabled me to show this within my book monitoring and I feel this has closed the gap.

Rosie- Peer sheets for verbal/ written verification to use KS3 which had a positive effect on the assessor and the performer, which gave them confidence to critically reflect.

Tom- Year 11 exam question analysis and peer assessment (Purple pen), improving student learning.

Sam- Batting in year 8 rounders. Video footage was observed by partners and honest critique was fed back. Students then videoed them again checking that feedback was completed and success had been had.

Feedback that hit any of our current obsessions-re-drafting, innovative, fast, SPaG etc.

and, of course, any of your own choice [just tell your colleagues why you chose it and think it is your best]

GCSE PE and Dance- See books and book monitoring- PR and PEPs for GCSE PE- SPS/ TE

Thank you as always to all who have shared ideas-part 3 next!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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